On tap.

Another round of heavy precipitation has dampened all fishing prospects here on California's Northcoast once again. Every river from Sonoma to Del Norte is set for a series of roller coaster dips and rises. The Klamath looks to be primed for the most dramatic surge, flirting with 300,000 CFS. 

Eel River

Eel River

Klamath River

Klamath River

Mad River

Mad River

Nothing for it except to break out the vice and whip up the next round of flies in anticipation of green water in the days and weeks ahead. I've been revisiting John Shewey's Classic Steelhead Flies between fits of rain to re immerse myself in the old patterns and history of the sport. 

Some fresh ones 

Some fresh ones 

One of my old intruders from last season. This fly was responsible for charming an especially large steelhead that put up one of the most epic fights after the grab. It got off eventually, but not before dragging me and accomplice Neil Mongrain through some death water. Sometimes a fly earns a place apart from the rest, because it proved itself and answered that ultimate question. Yes, they do eat a swung fly. Like hell they do. 

One of my old intruders from last season. This fly was responsible for charming an especially large steelhead that put up one of the most epic fights after the grab. It got off eventually, but not before dragging me and accomplice Neil Mongrain through some death water. Sometimes a fly earns a place apart from the rest, because it proved itself and answered that ultimate question. Yes, they do eat a swung fly. Like hell they do. 

Finally, I always find myself returning to Davie McPhail for fly tying inspiration. With his soft spoken lilting Scottish accent, the man is the Bob Ross of fly tying.  Enjoy.